Ohio State School for the Blind arithmetic board   Save
Ohio State School for the Blind arithmetic board
Description: 6" x 7.5" photograph of an arithmetic board from a collection of models for the Ohio State School for the Blind. The arithmetic board, a solid wood frame, had indented pockets, into which fit the 24 hearts used to teach arithmetic problems. The heart figures were made of compressed wood and painted in a primary color in contrast with the board. The layout of four different lines of figures allowed instruction in multiplication, addition, subtraction or fractions. Other arithmetic boards had figures of crescents, diamonds, circles, squares and stars. The process of using arithmetic boards was similar to the use of paper and pencil, but units were more easily understood than their numerical symbol. The model dimensions: width 14", height 9.5". Photographs and descriptions of models were included in the book "Models for the Blind," compiled by workers of the Ohio Writers' Program. The book was meant as a guide, to be used in the building and study of models, and as documentation of the achievements at the Ohio State School for the Blind. The models were a result of research, design and construction by employees of the Works Projects Administration. Models were made of durable materials to withstand regular usage. The average cost of labor for larger models was $45. A special room was built to store the models where teachers could borrow them to be used in classroom instruction. In 1837, the Ohio government established the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind. This institution was the predecessor of the Ohio State School for the Blind. It was the first public school for the blind in the United States. It was the first in the nation to be created and maintained entirely by the State government. The school opened its doors in 1839, and it was located in downtown Columbus, Ohio. Any blind children residing in Ohio could attend the institution. Eleven students enrolled at the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind this first year. The school initially had a maximum capacity of sixty students, but upon moving to a new building in 1874, more than three hundred students could attend at one time. Between 1839 and 1901, 2,058 students enrolled at the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind, with 339 attending in 1901 alone. In the early 1900s, the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind became known as the Ohio State School for the Blind, and the Ohio Department of Education assumed control of the school. In 1953, the school moved ten miles north of its original location to its present home. In 2005, 126 students enrolled in the Ohio State School for the Blind. Students as young as three and as old as twenty-one years of age attended the school. Students could receive their entire education (kindergarten through high school) at the institution. In addition, the Ohio State School for the Blind offered vocational training for its students. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B11F02_060_001
Subjects: United States. Work Projects Administration; Blind--Education--Ohio; Ohio State School for the Blind; Arithmetic Study and teaching
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)